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Pilkington Prize 2016

last modified Feb 11, 2016 09:32 AM
Two members of teaching staff within the School of Arts and Humanities have been awarded this year's Pilkington Prize by the University.

The School of Arts and Humanities is delighted to announce that two teaching staff from our institutions have been awarded a 2016 Pilkington Prize by the University of Cambridge.

 Dr Karen Ottewell of the University of Cambridge Language Centre (left) and  Dr Sophia Connell of the Faculty of Philosophy (right) were presented with the award, which is given annually by the University in recognition of excellence in teaching. The prizes are awarded to individuals who make a substantial contribution to the teaching programme of a Department, Faculty or the Unviersity as a whole. There are twelve prizes awarded each year, with nominations made by each School. The prizes are awarded by the Vice-Chancellor. 

Dr Connell has held Research Fellowships at Churchill and St. John’s College and teaching positions at the University of East Anglia and the Faculty of Philosophy, where she is currently Affiliated Lecturer.  She is Bye-Fellow, Special Supervisor and Director of Studies in Philosophy at Newnham College and Director of Studies in Philosophy at Selwyn and Emmanuel Colleges as well as a Fellow and Admissions Tutor at Selwyn.

Her main area of research interest is Aristotle’s biological works, and Dr Connell is presently working on papers on Platonic political philosophy, the ethics of abortion and Aristotle on human nature from a biological perspective.

Dr Ottewell is the Director of the Academic Development and Training for International Students section of the Language Centre which provides training and support to assist international students at the University in further developing and honing the skills required to succeed in an English-speaking academic context.

Dr Ottewell has been an External Examiner at the universities of Leeds and Aston, and is currently an External for the University of St. Andrews and a critical friend for the University of Winchester as well as a reviewer for Cambridge University Press. She has been a supervisor, and occasional examiner and lecturer, in German Language and Literature for several Colleges. Dr Ottewell is also a Fellow of Lucy Cavendish College.